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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 13, 2018 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. dentists warn of a child tooth decay crisis in england. a record 43,000 operations to remove rotting teeth were carried out last year. ministers say they're determined to tackle the problem. good morning, it's saturday 13th january. also this morning. african leaders demand an apology from donald trump after he's accused of making "vulgar and disparaging" comments about poorer nations. a ban on credit and debit surcharges comes into force today — but there are concerns companies could raise their prices in response. we can barely stand! celebrations overnight as four british rowers smash the world record for crossing the atlantic. in sport, across the irish sea, northern ireland boss michael o'neill is a step closer to taking over as scotland manager
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now that the scottish fa have agreed a deal to compensate his current employers. and making a splash. i've donned a tail fin to find out how "mermaiding" is becoming a growing sport in the uk. and sarah has the weather. cloudy today, increasingly wet and windy from the west, all the details of the weather today in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. there were almost 43,000 to extraction operations the children in england last year,. the british dental association says england provides a second—class service compared to scotland and wales, and has accused government ministers of adopting a short—sighted approach to a growing crisis around tooth decay. 0ur health correspondent dominic hughes reports. tooth decay in children is distressing, painful and avoidable. dentists say sugary snacks
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and drinks are the biggest cause. british children drink more soft drinks than anywhere else in europe and the number of multiple extractions which have to take place in hospital under a general anaesthetic is continuing to grow. figures compiled by the local government association show there were nearly 43,000 multiple to the extractions among under—18s in england last year. that's around 170 every day of the working week. 0verall, there's been an increase of i7% in just four years. dentists say children in england are suffering and are being offered a second—rate service when compared to scotland and wales. we have seen in scotland and in wales that they have got national programmes to try and prevent this and they have actually got reasonably good results out of it. the government has not put any money into a national prevention programme for england and that's the reason why we are seeing
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so many children being put under general anaesthetic. the department of health in england says the introduction of attacks on sugary drinks is part of its plan to reduce the number of extractions and that more than half of all children have seen a dentist in the last year. and, with proper oral hygiene, good brushing and avoiding high sugar snacks and drinks, thousands of children could be saved from experiencing the pain of a rotten tooth. dominic hughes, bbc news. the african union has demanded an apology from donald trump after he reportedly used a vulgar and disparaging term to describe some african nations. the african union has expressed its shock and outrage and said the trump administration misunderstood african nations. 0ur north american correspondent peter bowes reports. an extraordinary week even by donald trump's standards. it ended with a medical, a routine
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checkup that all presidents undergo and wood from the doctor that the commander—in—chief is apparently in excellent health. but the past two days have seen the president mired in controversy. as donald trump arrives in florida to spend the weekend at his golf resort, the international community is still fuming over his alleged use of crude language to describe african countries. as the african union we were quite appalled and infuriated, outraged, by the comments. and for a country like the united states, which is a valued partnerfor the africans, this is quite a shock. from the united nations in geneva came the stiffest of rebukes. these are shocking and shameful comments from the president of the united states. i'm sorry but there's no other word one can use but racist. you cannot dismiss entire countries and continents. the allegation has
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gone unanswered by the president. he had an opportunity at this ceremony in celebration of martin luther king. but it was awkward. after signing a proclamation in honour of the civil rights leader, mr trump dodged the most uncomfortable of questions. mr president, are you a racist? the president left without responding. he'd earlier tweeted that he'd used "tough" language in a meeting with senators but not the derogatory language attributed to him. peter bowes, bbc news. the leader of the liberal democrats, vince cable, said the president's visit to the uk should not go ahead. if that is the case the government will have to work harder to make sure it doesn't happen because it would be appalling if this man, in view of everything he has said and done, would come and be treated as a state visit. consumers can no longer be charged extra for paying by credit or debit card under new laws from today.
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it is hoped the ban will benefit shoppers and holidaymakers who buy goods online or in small stores, but some retailers have already said they will raise overall prices in response to the change. joe lynam reports. we've all seen them. the extra little fees added at the very end of the buying process. in percentage terms it may not sound like a lot, but card surcharges add up, until today. under a new eu directive a fire that broke out in nottingham station yesterday is now being yesterday's fire at nottingham train station is now being treated as arson, police have confirmed. the blaze began early yesterday morning. 10 fire crews tackled flames in the station's roof. the station was fully evacuated when smoke filled the foyer. it will re—open today. the troubled construction firm carillion, a key government contractor for projects including schools and prisons,
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has denied reports that its rescue plan was rejected by creditors. the firm is struggling under £1.5 billion of debt, including a pension shortfall of more than half—a—million pounds. the bbc understands that government ministers are drawing up plans to take over some of its prison contracts. so vince cable says that and in no circumstances should the firm be bailed out. tributes have been paid to the comedy actress bella emberg, who has died aged 80. she became a household name in the 19805 on the russ abbot show, playing characters including blunderwoman, the sidekick of hapless superhero cooperman. russ abbot called her "a huge comedy talent", while les dennis said she was a "funny, lovely friend". four british friends have broken the world record and become the fastest ever to cross the atlantic ocean in a rowing boat. the amateur crew, dubbed the four 0arsmen, made history when they reached the island of antigua just after 1:30 this morning, having spent 29 days at sea and beating the previous record by six days. dan johnson has more. and here they go!
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shouting the end of an epicjourney road in record time, four man who had not even been in a rowing boat 18 months ago not only challenge winners but the first to cross the atlantic in less tha n the first to cross the atlantic in less than 30 days. it feels overwhelming. the challenge as we said before is just relentless, never ending payment, just rowing, the whole thing, coming first is something that is beyond our wildest dreams. they left the canary islands 3000 miles away and faced 40 foot waves, scorching sun and howling winds, not quite the apocalypse but a test of endurance for the four 0arsmen. surviving on russians, producing their own water, taking it in turns to eat, to sleep, and to i’ow. in turns to eat, to sleep, and to row. it is amazing to complete the role. we set out as a charitable
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initiative, for mind, and spinal research, the mind research is commemorative of my mum and her struggle with her health. to do it such justice and do struggle with her health. to do it suchjustice and do it in struggle with her health. to do it such justice and do it in such style and with such great support and great success is amazing. just making it to the caribbean is a fantastic achievement but they have raised more than a quarter of £1 million and have rode their way into the record books. danjohnson, bbc news. congratulations to them. with ten minutes past nine. more on the top story, children in england getting second—rate dental treatment than those in scotland and ask according to the british dental association. it found children and teenagers have almost 43,000 operations to remove teeth in england last year which works out at
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170 operation today. an increase of 17% in the last four years. the bda says children in england are getting second—class service when it comes to oral health because unlike wales and scotland there is no dedicated national programme to tackle the problem. the department of health and social care says other half of all children in england visited a dentist last year and it is introducing a sugar tax to tackle tooth decay. we can talk to claire stevens, president of the british society of paediatric dentistry. good morning. anyone who hears these figures should be shocked, 43,002 operations on teenagers and children. 170 day. why is this situation at this point, and i presume it is worsening? the numbers of operations are going steadily up and have gone up by 15% in the last four years. the reason is not one single answer, it is about our
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children and young people, having it is about getting fluoride so parents and children need to brush their teeth with a fluoride toothpaste twice a day, in the morning and in the evening and it is getting children to see the dentist in the first place. they should certainly receive their dental check on their first birthday and every year thereafter. 14% of children in england and wales did not see a dentist last year. you are a dental surgeon. dentist last year. you are a dental surgeon. it's your dayjob. give us a snapshot of who you are treating and what you are seeing. have a routine operating list where i will remove multiple decayed teeth under general anaesthetic. needs can be so complex that they cannot be managed
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ina complex that they cannot be managed in a normal setting. i've had to remove in a normal setting. i've had to re m ove ba by in a normal setting. i've had to remove baby teeth and anaesthetic for a child of two, that's not read, thatis for a child of two, that's not read, that is something happening week in, week out. when this happened was this the first time the child had seen a this the first time the child had seen a dentist, was it a direct result of poor nutrition and poor dental care? this would be a child presenting to the dentist to the first time because they are in pain, the dentist will recognise that it is beyond their remit to manage and the high streets dentist to refer it to me and that first dental experience for a child will be traumatic, and a general anaesthetic. wouldn't it be great if the first time that child came to the first time that child came to the dentist it was a positive, happy experience where we could support the family, give preventative advice, help with weaning and then make sure that child avoids decayed teeth for the rest of their life?
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you also talk about teenagers who are having to have false teeth, in the early teens. that's right. we know that young people are consuming far too many sugary foods and drinks. and for teenagers it is often fizzy drinks, many of them drinking these daily or more regularly. i've had young people where we have removed so many permanent teeth we've had no option than to provide them with false teeth, imagine how that person will manage for the rest of their life without the natural teeth. manage for the rest of their life without the naturalteeth. so manage for the rest of their life without the natural teeth. so what is the answer. something is happening if 40% of children are not visiting the dentist, where is the system falling down? there needs to be measures, the sugar levy will be welcome when it is introduced in a few months‘ time, how about investing some of that income, in
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manchester we have a regional programme of prevention, we need to invest in the scheme of supervised brushing in the early years, reception, we are encouraging families to go to the dentists, and making sure they apply fluoride. we know we will save much more money when we are investing,. with the expertise that you have, the passion you have, surely there‘s only one person to blame and that should be the parent? i don't really like the word blame... we'll take that word out then, the only responsibility is for the parent to take the child to the dentist, it‘s important to tell people that their child needs the teeth removed because they have not
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done that. as big as a parent myself, of course parents have a responsibility but the profession also has a responsibility to educate the family so that they know you you need to take the child as soon as the first teeth come through. we need to make it easy for children to come into our services and that might mean working with school visitors, health visitors, to make sure we are getting children into the system. you don't think that people know that their children needed to see a dentist? there has been research that shows that pa rents been research that shows that parents don‘t realise how early you should come and also that it is free. i found that astonishing that pa rents were free. i found that astonishing that parents were not aware that nhs dental treatment was free for children. it may be that parents perceived barriers that are not there in reality. thank you we are time. president of the british
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paediatric society of dentistry. it is 16 minutes past nine o‘clock. it is 16 minutes past nine o‘clock. it is cold and foggy and i think we could see more of that but this is a beautiful picture, sarah, good morning. good morning, this is deal in kent, a gorgeous picture captured by one weather watcher. a lot more clout to come this weekend. it has been cloudy and great this past weekend, rain in the west, further east you are more likely to stay dry, the weather has been pushing into the south—west of england, up towards western scotland, in east it is dry at the moment because of this area of high pressure over scandinavia so the weather from the atlantic is bumping into this area, not making much progress on its way across the country so it will be damp for match
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of the day across south—west england. central and eastern parts of the uk, it is mostly dry, temperatures between five and 9 degrees, not far off work there will be for this time of year, not feeling pleasant and the cloud, should stay dry for most of our premier league football matches today, top temperatures in newcastle. this evening, all the rain in the west were tentative as lads are the weather front will begin to die away overnight. it is still cloudy and the rain will be lighter than last night said temperatures dropping a little lower, 3—4d to start sunday morning for most areas, and some mist and cloud during the course of sunday, many of us having a good deal of dry weather, the client should then and break up later, —— the cloud should
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break up later, —— the cloud should break up, turning windy towards the north—west which moves in late on sunday bringing heavy rain to parts of northern ireland and north—west scotland. windy as well, elsewhere keeping the dry weather will be fairly cloudy but that front and the north—west should mark a change to come, so sunday night and monday and beyond, the blue colours return to map the north—westerly map affair. but it will be quite a bit colder than before, windy and unsettled and we could see snow and ice returning, especially in the north. watch out for something called on the way, pretty grey out there for the rest of the weekend. back to you both. thank you, sarah. it is 19 minutes past mind, let‘s look at the papers. mike barton, chief constable of durham constabulary, joins us. let‘s
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look at the front pages first, keep eve ryo ne look at the front pages first, keep everyone up to date. the daily mail is leading on donald trump missing out on the uk visit, he has cancelled it, although he may also face the embarrassment, says the paper, of not being invited to the royal wedding which will be in may. royal household source says the guest list hasn‘t been announced that there is no reason why he wouldn‘t be invited. sir vince cable, speaking to this programme a short time ago, says it would be unthinkable if a state visit, at this stage is still on, went ahead. some of the front pages are looking at the australian flu epidemic, there is the daily telegraph, today programme presenterjohn humphrys faces criticism for conversation he had about the gender pay gap with a fellow journalist, of had about the gender pay gap with a fellowjournalist, of the error. 0n
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the front page of the financial times, the problems faced by infrastructure company carillion. they face major financial problems. we shall we start. i enjoyed this yesterday because it is a conversation that the queen had on camera, although not an official interview, talking about the crown jewels. this story emerged from this interview. a great story. the documentary will be on the bbc tomorrow night. this is the story that caught my eye, the royal family, george vi, hit the crown jewels in a biscuit tin. although it‘s a very posh biscuit tin, it is bartholomew‘s! and the trapdoor into which this was secreted is still there apparently. and so is the tin. if someone asked if i would like a bath 0liver biscuit i would not know what they were talking about. it is
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a well—known posh brand? read magazines because it has a. are not familiar with it. i think it must be because it has a crust on it. —— a crest. it's the weekend, is this why you have chosen a cocktail story? this is about how people have found old spirits and putting them into cocktails and charging a fortune for them. the one thing, whenever i see a cocktail story i always think, i must buy one of those books and then when people come around at christmas, do them. and i never do! the other thing that always catches my eye, do you know why they were invented? it was in america during prohibition, to disguise the terrible taste of the home—brew. let‘s go through some of these prices, you wouldn‘t want to drink too many. one of them would set you
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back £5,500. just for one cocktail. 0ne daiquiri at the savoy would cost about £700. it‘s because they‘ve dug up about £700. it‘s because they‘ve dug up this vintage bacardi. something like 40 years old. that is a lot of money. do you remember how much you wait when you were born, or rather, being told about it because you would not know how much you wade. how much did you way, charlie?” how much did you way, charlie?|j don‘t how much did you way, charlie?” don‘t know! i think i was something like nine lbs. my mum will be screaming at the tv now.” like nine lbs. my mum will be screaming at the tv now. i wasjust underfive lbs. screaming at the tv now. i wasjust under five lbs. this screaming at the tv now. i wasjust underfive lbs. this made me gasp when we went through the papers. the
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hand of a parent and the foot of a baby that has been born prematurely. but is now doing well, because she is now weighing 5.2 lbs. her birth weight was 14 ounces, she was just eight inches long. it is remarkable what medicine can do. my fifth grandchild arrived just before christmas, luke was five and a half weeks premature but still weighed five lbs. he did not suck on the teat for two and a half weeks because you have to be 36 weeks before they have this reflects. i did not know that. is everything fine now? is about ten lbs now and when he first cried he had a mousy squeak which i thought was a bit pathetic but now he has found his lungs although his mother isn‘t too thrilled about that!” lungs although his mother isn‘t too
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thrilled about that! i was going to say, not everybody would be happy about that. what else have you found. this is a dreadful story. in policing now, we are finding that crime is expanding, and the police are being asked to do far more. instead of depositing their rubbish safely, people are using others with transit vans and dumping bin bags on farmers lands. now here‘s a picture ofa farmers lands. now here‘s a picture of a very fed up beef farmer who now has to pay for this to be removed. the story, which i don‘t believe, is blaming fortnightly collections. it is not, it is the fault of these people who are criminals. if you‘ve got to much rubbish, either don‘t buy plastic, or take it to a household waste facility. you are in charge of policing in durham. visit all about priorities? some people would say, maybe they will call the police. nothing will happen. if
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someone police. nothing will happen. if someone is putting in a call this week to your constabulary sleep and seeing, i‘ve seen it happen, what will happen next. good question. the cou nty will happen next. good question. the county council have primacy that we work with them. it is a criminal offence. we have recently had someone offence. we have recently had someone who was fined a lot of money, he was a repeat offender, not enough money in my view. people a lwa ys enough money in my view. people always say what they want the police to concentrate on speeding, anti—social behaviour and fly—tipping. anti—social behaviour and fly-tipping. the problem is that these things happen in the middle of these things happen in the middle of the night. sometimes if you look through the bad people might have left a clue as to where to come from, credit card slip, and address, and a piece of paper, but in a lot
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of cases we don‘t find out. but there are a lot of cameras so we have hidden cameras now at the areas where people do fly—tipping. simply find the people fly—tipping the buddha camera in the hedge. —— if we find somebody fly—tipping we can put a camera in hedge. surely part of the problem is shared responsibility. if it was a police matter would you be able to deal with it more clearly? it seems you are having to have a dialogue about are having to have a dialogue about a criminal offence. you tackle it in two ways. first, dealwith a criminal offence. you tackle it in two ways. first, deal with it when you find it. i prefer not to do that. the best way is to use intelligence to find out who other people who are doing this regularly, and generally it‘s organised crime gangs. waste disposal is a huge area
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of crime because it is taxed. people will take your household waste and if they dump and it is £60 a tonne. they call it in and waste it is £5 a tonne. so the gangs collect this household waste and charge you a fortune from taking it away and then they disguise it, women and dumping it, as in and waste, and pocket the difference. thank you for going through the papers with us. have a lovely saturday. saturday kitchen is on this morning. matt, what is on the menu? i'm very welcome you might be surprised to learn that i was quite a big baby when i was born, i was a good ten lbs. i'm glad i'm sitting down, that‘s very surprising! that is a bit rude. special guest today is harry hill, facing food heaven and food hell. wonderful to be here, nice to be made to feel special. my food heaven
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is shellfish, clams and stuff, stuff i don't get at home. my food hell, i am not mad on pork or smellyjesus. cheeses. monica will be cooking. i'm doing a chicken curry, lime curry with rice. delicious, and the self—proclaimed prince of birmingham. ithink self—proclaimed prince of birmingham. i think i‘m a royalty. enough of that. we‘ll be having fantastic food, i‘m doing roast venison cutlets with winter vegeta bles venison cutlets with winter vegetables cooked in port, red wine, some peppercorns and crispy seaweeds. and today we will be drinking exclusively beer, in charge of the beer is ed hughes. have you got a lot lined up. big dishes, big
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flavours, some nice bierce. beers all the way through the show. and you guys that will decide whether harry will eat his food heaven or his would help, look on the website for details. i really want harry hill to be forced to eat smelly cheese. you need to fix it matt. this is the bbc, you can‘t do this, those days are gone! absolutely right. headlines coming up, see you soon. this is breakfast with nag goo
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munchetty and charlie stayt. a summary munchetty and charlie stayt. a summary of the main news. the number of hospital admissions to extra ct the number of hospital admissions to extract rotting teeth has increased bya extract rotting teeth has increased by a fifth in four years, leading to dentists to say that children in england receive a second class service compared to scotland and wales. the department of health and social care says the introduction of a sugar tax will tackle tooth decay. earlier, a dentist told us about treating patients, some as young as two. for the majority of the children, they would probably be aged between five to nine years of age, but it‘s not uncommon for me to remove all 20 baby teeth due to decay in a two—year—old child. i‘ve also had children perhaps around the age of 14 where we‘ve had to remove
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permanent teeth, usually due to fizzy drink consumption and necessitating the provision of denture, so false teeth at 14. sir vince cable has said donald trump should not have a state visit to the uk, following vulgar and disparaging comments apparently made by donald trump. surcharges will be illegal from today as a result of new eu rules to help consumers and improve transparency and fairness. the measures will benefit shoppers and holiday—makers making online or in—store purchases. some retailers have already said they‘ll raise prices to cover the cost. yesterday‘s fire at nottingham train station is now being treated as arson according to police confirmation this morning. the blaze began early yesterday morning, ten fire crews tackling the flames in the station‘s roof. the station was
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fully evacuated between smoke filled the foyer. it will re—open today. four british friends have become the fastest ever to row the atlantic 0cean fastest ever to row the atlantic ocean in fastest ever to row the atlantic 0cean ina fastest ever to row the atlantic ocean in a boat. known as the four 0arsmen. dickie taylor, journey biggar, peter robinson and stuart watts reached dry land just after 1. 30 this morning, having spent 29 days at sea, that is six days faster than the current world record for a four—man crew. now, a world famous story; friends in high places and five months old, but he‘s captured the hearts of millions. the first join panda to be born in france will meet his public for the first time. he lives with his parents at beauval zoo. he weighed just five ounces at birth but is now thriving, he‘s been walking... sort of, for the first time. i think these are older
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pictures, he‘s got better. time. i think these are older pictures, he's got better. yes, probably. he was named as brigitte macron, the wife of the french president, so friends in high places. i like mike's question about what do you do if you are godparent toa what do you do if you are godparent to a panda, you can‘t take them to a day out to the zoo. he's already there. never been askeded to be a godparent to any animal before. i‘ve got about seven or eight godchildren. crossing the irish sea. scotla nd godchildren. crossing the irish sea. scotland haven‘t won or been to a major tournament since 1998 so they are hoping by ate pointing the northern ireland manager michael o‘neill northern ireland manager michael 0‘neill that they can change that around. what he‘s done is done wonders at northern ireland. he is the one that they have wanted for the one that they have wanted for the topjob in the one that they have wanted for the top job in scotland since gordon strachan‘s departure in october. they have been trying to woo him for some time. they‘ve agreed a compensation package at last with the irish fa, which can trigger
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face—to—face talks next week. northern ireland defied all the odds qualifying for 2016, their first major tournament for 30 years. ryan giggs has been interviewed for the role of wales manager. he‘s among a number of candidates for the job vacated by chris coleman going to sunderland. another former player craig bellamy is also being considered. an announcement is expected next week. and the bbc understands, giggs‘ former team mate phil neville, is a contender to take over, as the england women‘s manager. neville has previously worked, as an assistant coach, with united, valencia and the england, under 21 mens sides. stop that was a dramatic end to the sheffield derby although it ended goalless, sheffield wednesday‘s new dutch manager will be pleased, when defender was sent off for a second
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bookable offence, sheffield wednesday could have won and in injury time that we are keeper produced some stunning saves. what i did was for llanelli scarlets in the rugby union champions cup, they won 35- at rugby union champions cup, they won 35— at bath, finishing off a brilliant try. and they sued a crucial bonus point with a fourth try from scott williams just after half—time. all this means that the llanelli scarlets go into the final round of fixtures with qualification in their own hands full as bath could slip out of the home to if toulon beat bennison tomorrow. england have a chance revenge for the ashes in the one—day shorter version of the game starting tomorrow in melbourne, captain eoin morgan says the specialist one—day players will lift the england side as they face australia game. understandably they‘ve been down with the defeat of the test tour
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which is disappointing but with the energy the guys have brought in, coming from big bash, home or playing in bangladesh previously, i think is very important for the squad in this series. i suppose it a lwa ys squad in this series. i suppose it always has been, given you play on the back of such a significant test match series. guys know the responsibility that they carry if they are feeling fresh, you know, to pick guys up along the way. yohanna konta says she has recovered from the hip injury, that disrupted her preparations for the australian open, which starts on monday in melbourne. the british number one, who is seeded ninth, plays american madison brengle in the first round, and is aiming to reproduce the form that took her to the semi—finals two years ago. i‘m coming into this year with very different challenges. i‘m feeling conscious of really appreciating being back and playing and almost being grateful for the challenges that i have now and also working true the challenges i faced at the end of last year and trying to really get back into the match routine of things, trying to get back into playing at the level that i want to be playing consistently.
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for centuries they‘ve been the stuff of myth and legend, but now mermaids and mermen are bringing their tailfins to the uk ahead of the merlympics — taking place here for the first time this summer. i‘ve been to claysmore school in dorset to find out why this new sport is making such waves. in the glow of the winter sun something associated with warmer climate is causing a splash. from fairy tales and fantasy and disney movies to reality. mermaids and mermen getting fit and even competing in one of the uk‘s new sports, thanks to cheaper and more accessible design of tails. up until now we‘ve had to learn to swim using ourfeet, but our feet are now replaced by these monofins, our tails. so no walking around the pool. it‘s a very strange feeling. as yet i feel like i have a new part of my body.
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if you get it right it can make you 33% faster through the water. it‘s definitely a different feeling. i‘m looking forward to actually seeing how it works with the fin. i‘m not sure about the old lycra sensation. it smashes through all stereotypes as you learn the faster and more powerful way of swimming through the water. basically where your hands and your head go your body will follow naturally and then doing the extra kick or flip with your leg will enhance your speed as well, so it‘s a really good full body workout. michelle was a surfer until she had an accident and then had to find a new role and job in life. now changing perceptions on a grand scale. there‘s always a glamour about a mermaid, but it really is a sport. it‘s one of the newest sports to come to the uk.
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the merlympics in germany last year featured racing, agility events, synchronised mer—swimming and tail awareness awards. i really felt the power! when you find your rhythm in the water and move as one, that tail... i crossed the pool in a couple of flicks! it feels like an added weight, but you get more power and you go faster. it really surprised me. compared to normal swimming it‘s a totally different sensation. having to keep your legs together as well. it‘s kind of like the feeling that shouldn‘t really happen, but because obviously you don‘t have fins as a human being, it feels amazing. i‘ve always wanted to be a mermaid and my dream has come true! while this had been a first for me
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in a pool, i have to confess i did pull on a tail while on holiday a few years ago to experience merman swimming in the sea. while it does look spectacular, in britain it needs to be done in a structured and supervised class in one of the growing numbers of clubs in the uk, just to eliminate the risk posed by the tails. if done so it can be a lot of fun, or should i say ‘fin‘. do not try that at home because the tails are heavy. up up to go toa up to go to a supervised session. do you have to be a strong swimmer? no, but you have to build up your core strength. you need the butterfly technique to use your core which then produces the big flick of the tail at the back. even you looked rather elegant in the water. well... you say that! nice of me, wasn't it.
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it streamlines you, the tail. you look good in anything! pay you later, thank you! consumers can no longer be charged extra for paying by credit or debit card under new laws from today. it is hoped the ban will benefit shoppers and holidaymakers who buy goods online or in small stores, but some retailers have already said they will raise overall prices in response to the change. jasmine birtlesjoins us now. you shouldn‘t get to the point where you see how much something is and a bit more is added. particularly when buying a plane ticket or paying for something with the government. the tax office for some time were taking credit cards and they would go, oh,
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yes, we‘ll add on an extra amount. they have said they are not going to ta ke they have said they are not going to take credit cards now because they can‘t charge that extra amount. where is the extra charging, what is the origin of this? the credit card companies themselves, they charge the businesses, so the businesses, it depends what it is, if it‘s a bank card, it‘s a small amount of 60p or something, but with credit cards, it can be a percentage, 1% say. this amount has gone down recently. even so, the businesses think, well we are being charged, we‘ll give it to the consumer. the thing is, they‘ve been giving that and some, so thing is, they‘ve been giving that and some, so consumers thing is, they‘ve been giving that and some, so consumers have been charged really more than even the amount that the businesses were paying as well. it wasn‘t fair. amount that the businesses were paying as well. it wasn't fair. the cynic in me suggests one way or another the consumer always pays, so it‘s disappeared now so maybe it will be sneaked in another way?m already has, absolutely. i meanjust eat, the delivery company, have already put on a "service charge" but they say it‘s nothing to do with
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credit card, it‘s just a 50p charge for everybody now. quite a few businesses will probably do that or they might do what consumers groups we re they might do what consumers groups were saying, which is either absorb the cost orjust put it into the total cost so that at least from the start, everybody knows where they are, it‘s this amount, you are not just going to come to the checkout and go, oh, so i thought it was this amount but you are adding this on, you know. so that is essentially what they‘re wanting. you know. so that is essentially what they're wanting. it means everything is going to go up if you are going to do it that way and so regardless of how you pay, say you are someone regardless of how you pay, say you are someone who always pays by cash, you are going to be hit regardless? this is true but then there are quite a lot of businesses now that are saying, actually, not only does it cost us to take cards, it costs us it cost us to take cards, it costs us to take cash because there is the time, you know, they have to pay workers to count up the cash and then when they input it into the bank, they are charged then. in fa ct, bank, they are charged then. in
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fact, i‘ve come across a few businesses in london anyway that are now only taking cards. i think this is possibly the future where the number of businesses will go, you know, we are not going to bother with cash now, all cards, this is the amount, end of. i know that in america last year, mastercard is giving $10,000 to small businesses if they would go completely card—only. so they would not accept cash, they‘ll only do cards. this could be the future. jasmine, thank you very much. time to talk to sarah with the weather. this is the sun rise in deal in kent. there are some glimpses of clearer skies then out there, but for the vast majority, through the rest of the weekend, we keep a lot of cloud. grey colours in the sky.
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some rain around across western parts in particular today. if we look at the radar, you can see where the rain‘s already been working in over the past few hours. it‘s a slow—moving band of rain. so if you have got the wet weather this morning, you are likely to keep it for much of the day. that is down to the fact that we have a big area of high pressure. this is bumping into the high pressure which means it can‘t move its way west—to—east so it will be slow—moving, bringing the rain to the south—west. you have still got a lot of cloud out there, but it will be a drier day. there should be a bit of brightness breaking through that cloud at times, particularly for parts of eastern england. temperatures five to nine. so pretty much where they should be at this time of year. it will feel chilly where you are stuck under the chowed where the breeze around too. this is how it‘s looking for the premier league matches
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today. 0n today. on to the evening hours, the rain in the west continues to ease in intensity and it will eventually fizzle out. mostly try through the course of the night and the winds will be easing too. with the lighter winds and a few clear spells, it will be a touch colder than last night so we could see mist and fog patches forming, early sunday morning and temperatures perhaps just low enough for a touch of frost. sunday, a pretty similar day to today for central and eastern areas. again it‘s cloudy. a bit more sunshine breaking through. an improved day for the north of wales, northern england too. later in the day, it turns wet and windy for the far north—west as this weather front approaches, but before it pushes in, approaches, but before it pushes in, a lot of fine and dry weather. not as windy as it is out there today. see the blue colours returning to the map into next week. so after several days of a lot of cloud and mild conditions, next week turns
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significantly colder. the winds coming in from the north or north—west, so a windy unsettled spell. this could be some snow around too. at least after the cloudy weekend, we should see a return to some sunshine with the colder conditions. bella emberg has died at the age of 80. she played characters including blunderwoman, a hapless side kick. she also starred in russ abbott‘s show and played alongside les dennis. lesjoins us now. show and played alongside les dennis. les joins us now. she was the loveliest person and she could play anything, you know, from the straight kind of dead pan faced when
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everybody else was cracking up, she could keep absolutely so perfectly still and dead pan. she could play that to any comic role. she underestimated herself, she didn‘t believe in her own talent. 0nce underestimated herself, she didn‘t believe in her own talent. once we got to know her more, we used to get cross with her because i first met her on tour. we were doing a tour in tore torquay with russ abbott and i was quizzing her about who she‘d worked with and she used to say, i‘m just a stooge and we‘d say no, believe in your talent. i think as she got older, she started to realise her work was good and that people loved her. she was just a wonderful woman and a wonderful talent. she sub generated many images of women didn‘t she? she wasn‘t afraid to be physically funny
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and embrace that, she didn‘t look like the glamorous girls that perhaps you would see in pop videos? when she first got the costume for blunderwoman, i remember her saying, "i am not wearing that" and we were like, go on, try it on because it was beautifully made, it was very much like the one that linda carter wore in the tv series but with the blunder instead of wonder. 0nce wore in the tv series but with the blunder instead of wonder. once she tried it on, everybody was in stitches. she had that kind of same thing, the same thing that russ had really, and that tommy cooper had, that they were funny without trying, they didn‘t have to do much and they we re they didn‘t have to do much and they were funny. i know she wanted, a lwa ys were funny. i know she wanted, always wanted to be a serious actress, you know, and i think if somebody gave her the chance to do something serious, she would have done it beautifully. les, i know recently there was an event to celebrate your career and she was there, just to show your friendship lasted for years? yes. she was
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approaching 80 and turned up with her partner rosemary, she was on a stick and she was like, i had to be here. a few weeks later, she came to see the adams family and that was the last time i saw her. my kids we re the last time i saw her. my kids were like, who is it daddy, tell me and showed them stuff and theyjust laughed out loud. it's amazing. how did it feel when these boundaries we re did it feel when these boundaries were being broken with the russ abbott madhouse and your laughter show, it almost felt like it was done by the seat of your pants, so to speak? it was, and it was in the kind of time of the ‘80s where we we re kind of time of the ‘80s where we were seen as kind of time of the ‘80s where we were seen as pretty much the mainstream stuff. it stood the test of time. it was harmless, a lot of people thought that bella was, you know, not sticking to the kind of feminist flag or not waving the
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feminist flag or not waving the feminist flag, but you know what, she was just feminist flag, but you know what, she wasjust being feminist flag, but you know what, she was just being funny and comic. people said about benny hill, that it was the mcgill postcard tradition and it was harm lith lest and wonderfully funny and stood the test of time. people even now will say, you know what, we got that wrong, it was funny stuff. i certainly laughed. les, thank you very much for talking to us, as i said at the beginning, you have lost your friend, so please accept our sincere condolences. thank you both. she wowed the crowds at glastonbury and now sigrid has been named bbc sound of 2018. more than 170 industry insiders who voted for the norwegian pop star believe she‘s going to be the next major music success , going to be the next major music success, joining the likes of ellie golding, sam smith and adele in winning that award. let us hear one
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of her tracks. # 0ur stories after the end # 0ur stories after the end # like strangers # like strangers # perfect pretenders # perfect pretenders #we # perfect pretenders # we are falling head over heels with something that ain‘t real #it with something that ain‘t real # it can never be us # it can never be us #just # it can never be us # just you and i # just you and i # strangers # strangers # perfect pretenders # perfect pretenders #we # perfect pretenders # we are falling head of heels # we are falling head of heels # something that ain‘t real # something that ain‘t real #it # something that ain‘t real # it can never be us. sigrid is with us now. look what you have done, you have worn a sweater so have done, you have worn a sweater so you blend in perfectly with the surroundings. you thought that through? yes. congratulations. thank you very much. has it been a bit of a whirlwind 24 hours? it's been crazy, yes. i was in london last week to do a promo every day. i‘m
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going home to norway now. what has been the reaction at home? my family are so been the reaction at home? my family are so proud and happy. it‘s really nice. tell us about how you have got to this point in terms of music because i‘ve listened to a couple of recent interviews and, this wasn‘t your big ambition from the beginning? no. you are quite academic? well, my parents are not musician s so they have never pushed me into any direction. i wanted to become a lawyer or teacher, or work in politics. i guess i figured out that music was the one thing i really loved and my pa rents the one thing i really loved and my parents noticed as well. i wrote my first song when i was 16, i was my own manager. i did a few gigs then quit to goat my grades and finish high school. my parents told me
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after high school, do you really not wa nt to after high school, do you really not want to try music, you might regret it. i tried want to try music, you might regret it. itried it. luckily i‘m here! yes, it‘s amazing. it. itried it. luckily i‘m here! yes, it's amazing. what was the breakthrough moment when you thought going from something you love and giving it a try turned into something big going on? well, i've been so lucky working with so many talented people and i think after i spoke to my management, they said i think we are going to london to write some songs, that‘s when i realised, is this happening, i‘m going to london by myself. i met the amazing team in the uk and yes, i think it was great. very lucky. how old are you now? 21. three years, your life must have changed quite significantly. who keeps yourfeet on the ground? well, i don't see it
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asa on the ground? well, i don't see it as a big reason for changing just because stuff is happening, but, you know, i hang out with my family a lot and my friends. do you know what i really like. this is moment you found out you got the award and you are wearing the same jumper. that‘s true! that is down—to—earth, not having a ridiculously big wardrobe for every appearance. it's quite impractical travelling all the time. i have a big suitcase which is waiting for me now. with just the one sweater? a couple of big woollen sweaters. it‘s about keeping healthy and making sure my throat doesn‘t hurt. we saw a clip from one of the singles. your on stage presence, people are commenting about how you move around when singing and all that stuff, that is just the way you are, that is just something that happens is it, that‘sjust you? are, that is just something that happens is it, that'sjust you?” don‘t go around like that 24—7 but it shows when i‘m on stage. it‘s difficult to sing and burst out with so difficult to sing and burst out with so many emotions without moving. i‘ve been dancing for ten years or
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so. i‘ve been dancing for ten years or so. some people plant themselves and sing, don't they? ifind it so. some people plant themselves and sing, don't they? i find it so impressive. you feel that you need to just impressive. you feel that you need tojust move? impressive. you feel that you need to just move? yes. impressive. you feel that you need tojust move? yes. i like your impressive. you feel that you need to just move? yes. i like your way because it shows you are in the music and the moment and this is how you feel it should come across. you have worked with some great people. we have some footage of you with jools holland. who is on your list now because you are at a point wlrks you realise it or not, where you can start your people putting out feelers and people will go yes, i wa nt to feelers and people will go yes, i want to do something with her. who is on your list? for me, it's all about chemistry in the studio. the most important thing for me is to work with someone i have a musical chemistry with but i don‘t know. i i don‘t know if i have a list of names. i don‘t know, neil young would be a dream like in ten years or so. would be a dream like in ten years or so. neilyoung? it's a big would be a dream like in ten years or so. neil young? it's a big family hero for us, we‘ve listen listening to him our whole life. dream big. absolutely. lovely to see you this
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morning. thank you so much for coming in. safe journey home. thank you. that is it from us. ben and rachel will be with you tomorrow. bye— bye. this is bbc news. i‘m shaun ley. the headlines at ten. the african union demands an apology from president trump for derogatory remarks he reportedly made about the continent. we were quite appalled and infuriated, outraged by the comments. warnings of a tooth decay crisis amongst children in england — a record 43,000 operations to remove rotting teeth were carried out last year. a ban on credit and debit surcharges comes into force today but there are concerns companies could raise their prices in response. also in the next hour.. tributes paid to bella emberg who
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has died aged 80. the comedy actors became a household name on the russ abbot show, he has described her as a
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